Freeport-McMoRan Foundation Grant Preserves and Honors New Mexico Mining History

Freeport-McMoRan Foundation Grant Preserves and Honors New Mexico Mining History

Edward Zavala of Raton, N.M. replaces artificial flowers at the grave of his father, Jesus V. Zavala, at Dawson Cemetery. Edward says his dad was the last miner to be buried in the cemetery before the town closed in 1950. (Nick Pappas/Albuquerque Journal)

A white iron cross bearing the name of Nick Arhondakis is one of nearly 400 in Dawson Cemetery memorializing the miners killed in the 1913 and 1923 mine explosions. Nick Arhondakis was one of 263 men who died in the 1913 incident, the second-deadliest mine disaster in U.S. history. Another 120 lost their lives in 1923. (Nick Pappas/ Albuquerque Journal)

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Thursday, December 19, 2019 - 7:25am

CAMPAIGN: Freeport-McMoRan: Communities & People

CONTENT: Article

In March 2019, the Freeport-McMoRan Foundation awarded a $65,000 grant to be used toward much-needed preservation work at the cemetery in Dawson, New Mexico. Hundreds of miners were laid to rest in the early 1900s at the cemetery, which is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Preservation work included a new fence to keep animals such as cattle and elk from damaging the headstones, a new drainage system and general maintenance.

To learn more about how Freeport-McMoRan supports the communities in which it operates, please visit fcx.com and freeportinmycommunity.com.

Please see the 2018 Working Toward Sustainable Development Report for more information on all of their social, economic and environmental efforts.