The X Factor: How Johnson & Johnson Has Helped Ignite the Power of Women Since 1886

The X Factor: How Johnson & Johnson Has Helped Ignite the Power of Women Since 1886

Johnson & Johnson employees from the early 20th century and today

Johnson & Johnson employees from the early 20th century and today

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1908. That’s the year Johnson & Johnson hired its first female scientist. In honor of #IWD, read how they have worked to advance and celebrate women both inside and outside the company for over 130 years: http://bit.ly/39INy08 #EachforEqual #healthforhumanity @JNJNews

Summary

For International Women's Day, we’re taking a look at some of the ways the company has shown its commitment to women—from industry-leading employee benefits to life-changing innovations.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020 - 9:30am

CONTENT: Article

1908.

That’s the year Johnson & Johnson hired its first female scientist—no small feat during an era when less than 3% of women attended college.

Then again, this is hardly surprising for a company whose first 14 employees included eight women—and whose workforce today is nearly 50% female. In fact, Johnson & Johnson's diversity and inclusion programs helped it claim the #2 spot on the Thomson Reuters Diversity & Inclusion Index in 2017.

Gender Fair—an organization that rates companies on their fairness practices for leadership, employee policies, advertising and philanthropy—also certified Johnson & Johnson as being Gender Fair in 2018. The company ranked in the 93rd percentile of companies assessed for eligibility—and was named the top-ranking over-the-counter/pharmaceutical company with the certification. Only 16% of analyzed Fortune 500 companies meet certification standards.

In honor of International Women’s Day—this year’s theme is #EachforEqual, which promotes a gender-equal world—here are just some key facts and figures that show how Johnson & Johnson has worked to advance and celebrate women both inside and outside the company for over 130 years.​