TransCanada Corporate Social Responsibility

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TransCanada Corporate Social Responsibility

Following through on our commitment to being a leader in responsible energy development, TransCanada launched its latest 2015 Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Report (PDF, 6.85 MB) under the heading Integrity & Responsibility.

Leading the Way

As a leading energy infrastructure company, the crux of our challenge in this changing energy landscape is to safely deliver the energy the world economically, environmentally and socially responsible manner.

For more than 65 years, TransCanada has delivered energy safely and reliably to meet North American demand, so we know from experience that how well we do as a company is inextricably linked to the sustainability of our business practices.

About our 2015 CSR Report

Doing the right thing is imperative to our business.

The public is increasingly engaged in issues related to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) – including placing increased demand on companies to deliver on their broader social responsibilities.

While we’ve been producing our Corporate Social Responsibility Report since 2001, we are committed to continuous improvement in our CSR reporting and practices. As such, we continue to streamline our efforts and ensure our corporate values are embedded within the work we do every day. These efforts, our policies, and performance are summarized annually in the CSR Report.

In 2012, TransCanada defined CSR as our “commitment to operating in an economically, socially and environmentally sustainable manner, while recognizing the interests of our stakeholders.” In addition, we established a CSR office tasked with raising standards on our reporting and performance. We have invested time and resources to determine the most important issues facing our company and develop more rigorous programs to track our performance, identify gaps and minimize risk.

We continue to work toward alignment with the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G4 standard, allowing us to set targets and measure our performance in a manner that is consistent with our industry peers as we continue our journey toward more comprehensive reporting. The GRI serves as the de facto global standard for CSR reporting. Since 1999, GRI has provided a comprehensive Sustainability Reporting Framework that is widely used around the world, and G4 is the latest update to the framework. Now more than 80 per cent of the 250 largest companies in the world are aligning to GRI reporting standards.

In 2015, we made significant progress toward our goal of reporting to the GRI G4 standard at the Core level. We recognize that your understanding of our corporate social responsibility practices and performance influences your level of trust in our company and in our industry. TransCanada believes that being transparent and providing accurate information on our business is critical to a balanced energy discussion.

In this report, we have enhanced our level of disclosure by including new information on topics like water use, lobbying and political contributions, leak detection, supply chain and risk management. In addition, we have reported some information in a more comprehensive way, such as our Occupational Health and Safety performance as compared against industry averages and including employee wages and benefits information in the discussion of economic value generated by our operations. Moving forward, we will continue to work toward:

  • Formally engaging external stakeholders on material issues assessments
  • Setting sustainability goals and targets
  • Gaining external assurance for our annual CSR Report
  • Aligning with GRI G4 Industry Specific Disclosure requirements

TransCanada is committed to doing the right thing, and our ever evolving and improving sustainability reporting provides evidence of that commitment in action.

10 Material Issues

SAFETY

  • Ensuring our assets are safe and reliable
  • Protecting our communities
  • Health and safety

SOCIETY

  • Responsible stakeholder relations
  • Indigenous peoples

ENVIRONMENT

  • Ensuring environmental stewardship
  • Protection and performance

ECONOMY

  • Financial performance
  • Access to new markets
  • Developing our people
  • Ethical conduct

Learn More

Content from this campaign

Contributing to Cleaner Air
Air; it’s something we all share. Clean air is important to all of us. When air quality is poor, it affects all of us. But for the three million Canadians who suffer from asthma, poor air quality can be life threatening. As a recent...
Jul 21, 2015 10:35 AM ET
Continued support for Nature Conservancy of Canada
Fences are a common element in the North American landscape. They have plenty of benefits including keeping wildlife from wandering onto highways, keeping predators from attacking livestock and marking property boundaries. But they can pose a hazard for birds if they are not easy to see while flying. Thankfully, there are some simple things that can be done to make fences safer for...
Jul 17, 2015 7:00 AM ET
Employee uses first aid to help in aftermath of Nepal earthquake
TransCanada employee Dana Engler and his son, Shaun, had just sat down for lunch at their hotel in Thulo Syabru, Nepal on Apr. 25 when the earth began to heave. As the walls crashed down around them, they stumbled out of the hotel with their guide while yelling at everyone to get out of the collapsing building. Within the first 10 seconds of the earthquake, they made it to the...
Jun 24, 2015 7:00 AM ET
Quick Action and Teamwork Protects Sustainable Farm from Wildfire
Quick action and immediate willingness to help a neighbor made a big difference in saving property and wildlife habitat from even worse destruction during Oregon’s first major brush fire of the season. The fire consumed an estimated 40,000 acres in north-central Oregon, according to Boardman Rural Fire Protection District Lt. Casey Zellars. “We had pretty much all the emergency...
Jun 11, 2015 2:00 PM ET
Employees Mentor Calgary Youths
Participation in Junior Achievement (JA) programs produces more financially literate graduates who save more, borrow less and go bankrupt less often than the average Canadian, according to a comprehensive study completed by the Boston Consulting Group in 2010. The study also shows that JA graduates are three times less likely to spend more than they earned, 25 per cent less likely to be...
Jun 8, 2015 1:40 PM ET

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