Tribal Monitors Help Preserve Cultural Heritage

Tribal Monitors Help Preserve Cultural Heritage

Members of the Alabama-Coushatta tribe monitor for signs of cultural significance along the Houston Lateral Pipeline

Multimedia from this Release

Cultural investigators: Steve Carpenter, SWCA Environmental Consultants project archaeologist and principal investigator (left) and Nathan Williams, Alabama-Coushatta Tribe monitor, look for areas of cultural and historic significance to the Coushatta Tribe along the Houston Lateral pipeline.

Historic moment: Tribal celebrations at the inauguration of Alabama-Coushatta Chiefs in Livingston, Texas. The Alabama-Coushatta Tribe provides awareness, knowledge and information on the significance of the land that enhances TransCanada’s understanding of the Coushatta community.

Monday, March 3, 2014 - 10:25am

CONTENT: Blog

Along the Houston Lateral pipeline, Alabama-Coushatta tribal monitors provide awareness, knowledge and information on the significance of the land that enhances TransCanada’s understanding of the Coushatta community. The tribe arrived in Texas in 1807 and was later placed on a reservation in Livingston, a town in East Texas. This unique tribe of people inhabited the east bank of the Trinity River, currently Liberty County.

The tribal monitoring program is administered through TransCanada’s regional tribal liaison, lead environmental inspectors and the Houston Lateral project team. Monitors are required to adhere to a Tribal Monitoring Plan and report daily and weekly activities that identify the areas and activities monitored that week, issues or concerns that were encountered and how the issue was resolved.

To read more about how Alabama-Coushatta tribal monitors are working with the Houston Lateral Project click here...

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