Young Data Scientists Help Nonprofits and City Governments Harness Their Data

Young Data Scientists Help Nonprofits and City Governments Harness Their Data

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Friday, October 4, 2019 - 11:15am

CAMPAIGN: Bloomberg: Philanthropy & Engagement

CONTENT: Article

Organizations across the world are employing small armies of data scientists in order to unlock the potential of their troves of data. Employing emerging technologies like machine learning and neural networks, as well as a range of statistical analysis methods, these organizations are able to mine valuable insights from their data. However, this kind of research is expensive, often requiring highly-educated personnel. Although small organizations like municipalities and non-profits are sitting on mountains of data, they often lack the budgets to mine it with data science.

Bloomberg’s Data for Good Exchange (D4GX) Immersion Fellowship Program was designed to ensure that these smaller, but important organizations aren’t left behind in the Big Data revolution. The program pairs Ph.D. students studying data science with Bloomberg Philanthropies supported non-profits and municipalities, in order to provide these organizations with invaluable data analysis insights on a pro bono basis.

“The D4GX Immersion Fellowship program gives non-profits and municipalities access to unlock new ways for data science and analytics to help solve specific challenges they face,” says the D4GX Conference Director, Vicki Cerullo, “It is also an opportunity for students to put their data science skills to use in a way they may not have experienced in an academic setting. This is a true embodiment of data for good.”

The Immersion Fellows recently presented their findings and shared their experiences at this year’s D4GX conference. Here are four exciting projects that participated in this year’s D4GX Immersion Fellowship Program.

Click here to read the full story on bloomberg.com.