Captain Al Haynes ‘Made the Impossible Possible’

Captain Al Haynes ‘Made the Impossible Possible’

Pictured, Captain Al Haynes

Pictured, Captain Al Haynes

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Today, @United honors Captain Al Haynes who died Sunday at the age of 87 in Seattle. Captain Haynes was one of the pilots credited with saving 184 lives when United Flight 232 crashed at Sioux City, IA in 1989: http://bit.ly/34PL0vl
Tuesday, August 27, 2019 - 9:00am

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Today, we honor Captain Al Haynes who died Sunday at the age of 87 years old in Seattle. Captain Haynes was one of the pilots credited with saving 184 lives when United Flight 232 crashed at Sioux City, Iowa in 1989.

One hundred twelve of the 296 people on board died as a result of the crash, including Flight Attendant Rene Le Beau, who was working the flight. But the actions of the flight and inflight crews, air traffic control representatives, local officials and first responders that day saved many lives.

"The United family bids farewell to one of our greatest, and a legend in aviation," said Oscar Munoz, CEO, United Airlines. "Thirty years since he helped save 184 lives, Captain Al Haynes' name remains synonymous with skill and grace under pressure. His more than three decades of service, as well as his dedication as a mentor, ensures his legacy will live on in generations of aviators he taught and inspired. The United family was blessed to have had him on board - on that fateful day and every day he served with us. Godspeed, Al."

"He made the impossible possible," said Jan Brown, the retired flight attendant working in the lead position on Flight 232 the day of the crash. She described the moment she opened the door to the flight deck: "It was as palpable as the blast of heat from a furnace, how the enormity of the crisis hit me. Part of my brain froze. Al didn't even turn around, just told me what I needed to know. He saved my life and so many lives. Bless his heart forever."

"Having a drill, having a plan, and taking it seriously, and working on it, is very, very important," Captain Haynes said, in a presentation he made to the NASA Ames Research Center in Edwards, California, in 1991.

Read Captain Haynes discuss Flight 232 here