Dry January Isn’t for Everyone, Experts Say. Some Drinkers Need Treatment. Others Are Trying Dry-Ish January

Dry January Isn’t for Everyone, Experts Say. Some Drinkers Need Treatment. Others Are Trying Dry-Ish January

By Kate Thayer
Cocktails, sans alcohol, sit atop a bar at Flight Club in January 2019 in Chicago. (Armando L. Sanchez / Chicago Tribune)

Cocktails, sans alcohol, sit atop a bar at Flight Club in January 2019 in Chicago. (Armando L. Sanchez / Chicago Tribune)

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.@BacardiLimited highlights Dry-ish January as a mechanism for mindful drinking: http://bit.ly/2N54zbN #DryJanuary via @chicagotribune
Thursday, January 9, 2020 - 12:00pm

Dry January has become an annual trend in the past several years, prompting many to abstain from alcohol for the inaugural month of the year.

But does it work?

While it’s not unusual for bars to capitalize on the Dry January trend, offering mocktails as an alternative to patrons, there’s another mechanism for mindful drinking: Dry-ish January, according to Jennifer Contraveos, Chicago-based senior portfolio ambassador for Bacardi USA.

“It’s certainly a trend we’re not only seeing at the start of any new year,” she said. “In many facets, people are more conscious of what we are putting into our bodies” year-round.

Recognizing the trend, bartenders are offering not only alcohol-free drinks, but also recipes that use lower alcohol liquors or other substitutions to make for a good “Dry-ish” drink, Contraveos said.

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