Wells Fargo's Culture of Caring for Communities

Wells Fargo's Culture of Caring for Communities

At Wells Fargo, corporate social responsibility and caring for our communities is part of our culture -- fundamental to our vision and values and the way we manage our company. We understand and embrace our responsibility to help create more resilient and sustainable communities and focus on developing deep relationships with community partners and other stakeholders to support economic growth. We are one of the top philanthropic contributors in the U.S., supporting nonprofits and community groups with over $1.1 billion in grants over the last four years (2011-2014). Since 2012, we’ve provided $17 billion in community development loans and investments to advance affordable housing, job creation, community services, and economic development in low- and moderate-income areas.  We believe our success as a company results from the care and compassion of our team members who bring our culture to life each day. During 2014, our team members volunteered 1.74 million hours and set a company record by pledging $97.7 million to nonprofits and schools.

Wells Fargo's CSR strategy is focused on three social, economic, and environmental priorities:

  • Social: Invite diverse perspective. Address the demographic imperative by expanding our efforts to meet the growing, varied needs of our global customer base, team members and supply chain.
  • Economic: Strengthen financial knowledge and opportunities. Improve human well-being and social equity by investing in underserved and underbanked communities by exploring new ways to expand access to high-quality and responsible financial products, services, education and solutions.
  • Environmental: Be environmentally proactive. Accelerate the transition to a “greener” economy and more sustainable communities by financing renewable energy, clean technology, and other environmental opportunities, while enhancing the environmental performance of our operation.

To download a full copy of Wells Fargo's 2014 Corporate Social Responsibility Interim Report, visit: http://bit.ly/WellsFargoCSR2014​ 

Content from this campaign

Scout’s Vision: Tiny Home for Homeless Veteran
Step by step, teenager Tim Maron’s vision of home for a homeless military veteran has become reality in a resurgent, small-town neighborhood once infested with drugs and crime. Today, that neighborhood is known for its clean streets and renovated homes, thanks to a local nonprofit, and most recently a modest tiny house project led by Maron, 17, a Boy Scout...
Jan 10, 2019 4:30 PM ET
Catalyst For Giving
As a child, Tim Rios remembers going food shopping with his parents. He and his siblings weren't allowed to enter certain aisles in the supermarket because the adults didn't want their children to get tempted by unhealthy snacks and especially food the family couldn't afford. "My parents worried all the time about getting enough healthy food on the table," Rios, whose family came to the U.S....
Dec 13, 2018 9:05 AM ET
Hunger Isn’t Where You Think It Is
Cornfields and dairy farms were everywhere in Byron, Minnesota, where I grew up, but that doesn’t mean everyone had enough to eat. My home state is one of the country’s leading agricultural producers, but even so, 1 in 11 households in Minnesota is affected by hunger. The fact is,...
Nov 30, 2018 10:10 AM ET
It’s a Boat! It’s a Plane! It’s a Wells Fargo Banker!
The summer season in Alaska offers a small window of time for rural communities to restock the supplies they need to survive the long, harsh winter ahead. With the rivers no longer choked with ice and daylight lasting nearly 24 hours, barges bring these remote towns everything from raw building materials to oil for heating homes and fueling vehicles. Watch the video at...
Nov 30, 2018 8:00 AM ET
Veterans Helping Veterans in a Civilian Workforce
When Wells Fargo team member Mark Durazo was 18 years old and growing up in the small, mining town of Bisbee, Arizona, he wasn’t sure what to do with his life, but he knew he needed to find some kind of purpose. His dad had been a cook for the U.S. Army, and his uncle had retired from the U.S. Air Force after serving for more than 25 years, so he decided to follow in their footsteps.  “...
Nov 23, 2018 9:00 AM ET

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